Sunday, August 02, 2015

Sweden’s Sharks Heading Towards Extinction

Via The Local:

According to the Swedish Species Information Center, the Swedish shark population is severely depleted and there are no clear signs of recovery.

On Monday, two spotted catsharks were released from the dock outside marine aquarium Havets Hus in Lysekil in western Sweden, having been reared on a diet of shrimp and squid.

“We have them here for three years, so we see that they eat well and they can get bigger. We think that their survival rate is better than when they are small”, Helen Sköld, an aquarium manager at Havets Hus told Swedish news agency, TT.

Since 2002, some 60 examples of the protected spotted red catshark have been reared and released at Havets Hus. In addition to strengthening the stock of this species, the catshark releases have also served to bring to light the fact that a large number of the world's shark species are threatened with extinction.

The classic image of a shark fin that protrudes menacingly from the water is an unusual sight in Sweden.

But now and then larger species of sharks, such as basking sharks and porbeagle (otherwise known as a mackerel shark), are seen in Swedish waters.

And in 2004 a stranded oceanic whitetip shark was found in Gullmarsfjorden in Bohuslän.

There are up to 19 varieties of sharks in Swedish waters, but aside from the spiny dogfish shark, only the small-spotted catshark is more common.

According to Mikael Svensson, of the Swedish Species Information Centre (Artdatabanken), the Swedish spiny dogfish population is considered critically endangered and has fallen by over 90 percent in the last 80 years.

In 2004 commercial fishing of dogfish was banned.

But despite the fishing ban, the spiny dogfish population is not recovering.

That's because sharks have a long life cycle. Females do not become sexually mature until 10-15 years of age, have a 24-month gestation period and only give birth to a few young.

This makes sharks particularly susceptible to extinction.

According to Mikael Svensson, the future of Swedish sharks remains gloomy, after years of hard fishing and trawling activity that destroyed their habitat.

“No one sees what happens in the ocean. If this kind of species destruction had happened on land, people would have shouted themselves hoarse long before it had gone this far”.

Saturday, August 01, 2015

Neil Armstrong: On The Moon We Were Ordered By Aliens To "Move Away"

Via Disclose.tv:

August 1, 2015 - Here are the statements by the former astronaut:

Professor: What really happened out of Apollo 11?

Armstrong: An amazing thing, even though we have always known of this possibility. The fact is that they (aliens) have ordered us to turn away!

Professor: What do you mean “warned to move away”?

Armstrong: I can not go into details, there are structures on the Moon, and not ours. I can only say that their ships were far superior to ours both in size and technology. Wow if you were big! … And menacing!

Professor: But NASA also sent to the moon missions after Apollo 11 ….

Armstrong: Naturally, NASA had already announced at that time, and could not risk panic on Earth.

According to the American ufologist Vladimir Azhazha, “Neil Armstrong said to Mission Control that two large unknown objects were watching him and Aldrin after landing on the moon. But this message was never heard by the public, because NASA censored it". But a 2006 video interview made by astronaut Neil Armstrong, analyzed the footage of the meeting between the Apollo 11:02 UFO. This was just one of many “encounters” with aliens, during the journey to the moon.

Aleksandr Kasantesev says Buzz Aldrin made a color film of the UFO from inside the ship, and continued filming them, Armstrong, and himself even when they were out. Armstrong confirmed that the story was true but refused to give more details, then admitted that the CIA wanted to hide the incident.

It should also be added that for some time an audio file circulates on the Internet that contains the conversation between the astronauts and the control center in Houston, captured from various terrestrial radio stations frequency ultra-fast, before NASA suppressed in the telecast that illustrated the arrival of Apollo XI on the moon (NASA despite assertions to the contrary. There was in fact a slight shift between the real-Apollo NASA communications and those relayed to the world).

Here is the full text:

Astronaut 1: But what is that?

Astronaut 2: Do you have an explanation?

Houston: Do not worry, stick to the program!

Astronaut 1: My God, it’s amazing, that’s great, you could not even imagine!

Houston: We know this, go to the other side!

Astronaut 1: What the hell is that? It’s amazing …… God … but what is it? So, you tell me?

Houston: Change frequency, use Tango, Tango!

Astronaut 1: Then it is a form of life, that one!

Houston: Change frequency.

Houston: Use Tango Bravo, Bravo Tango, choose Jezebel, Jezebel!

Astronaut: …… yes! Matutto … .. this is incredible!

Houston: Switch on Bravo Tango, Tango Bravo!

At this point the connection is broken.

Increase In Violence In Swedish Asylum Centers

Via The Local:

The Swedish Migration Board (Migrationsverket) has so far this year recorded almost as many reports of threats and violence in asylum accommodation as throughout the whole of 2014, according to the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter.

So far this year the Swedish Migration Board registered 804 incidents, of which 516 occurred at places where asylum seekers often have to share the room with people of a different nationality. Other incidents have occurred at meetings with agency personnel. The incidents relate not only to threats and violence, but also to vandalism, arson and attempted suicide.

“It's a very volatile situation”, Monica Karum Bergvall of the Swedish Migration Board. “There are long delays and overcrowding. Many people feel bad and feel a great deal of frustration. Then they may become intimidating to our officers or other residents”.

“There may also be unreported events that occur when we do not have staff in place. We do not have around-the-clock staffing”, says Bergvall told Dagens Nyheter.

Solvig Ekblad, professor of multicultural health services research at the Karolinska Institute, says that many asylum-seekers can experience powerlessness during the asylum process and that it is not surprising that many react.

“These people need structure and activities during the day in order to try to normalize life as much as possible”.

As The Local reported earlier this year, asylum seekers arriving in Sweden are likely to face a wait of up to six months before they can have their case heard, as migration officers struggle to cope with the workload.

“The processing times are pretty long compared to Germany, which has a fast-track lane, and integration in Sweden. It is difficult to get housing and jobs; this affects people's choice of destination country”, Anders Danielsson, head of the Swedish Migration Board said in July.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Swedish Sub Wreck An Imperial Russian Vessel

Via The Local:

A wrecked submarine found off the coast of Sweden is likely a Russian vessel that ran aground a century ago, the Swedish Armed Forces told The Local on Tuesday afternoon.

Video footage by a group of salvage hunters purporting to show a wrecked underwater vessel in Swedish waters is likely that of a Russian so-called 'Som class' submarine (nicknamed 'Catfish') which sank in May 1916, an analysis by the Swedish Armed Forces suggested on Tuesday afternoon.

"It was found outside the coast of Uppland (a region in central Sweden just north of Stockholm) and according to the video material it is a Russian 'Som' submarine, which sank after it collided with a Swedish vessel in 1916", press spokesman Jesper Tengroth told The Local.

The submarine was built for the Imperial Russian Navy in Vladivostok in 1904 and integrated into the naval fleet in the Baltic Sea in 1915. It ran aground with an 18-member crew a year later.

Earlier in the day, government-owned Russian news site Sputnik News launched a verbal attack on Sweden, saying that "the paranoia has not ceased". "Here we go again..." said the scathing article, referring to last year's submarine hunt in the Stockholm archipelago.

"It was expected that they would respond in this way. If the submarine is shown to be historical the Russians will mock Sweden even more", Tomas Ries, senior lecturer at the Swedish Defence University (Försvarshögskolan), predicted in an interview with The Local earlier on Tuesday.

Monday, July 27, 2015

Sweden Sees Fall In Public Urination Fines

Via The Local:

At least 1.500 people have been fined for urinating in public in Sweden so far this year, showing a decrease in the offence compared with the same period last year.

According to figures from the Swedish police and compiled by the investigative news agency Nyhetsbyrån Siren, 1,500 people were fined for public urination in Sweden between January and June this year.

The number shows a decrease compared with the same period last year when 1.684 were fined.

Urinating in public is a criminal offence in Sweden and anyone caught doing it could face a fine for disorderly conduct.

Public urinators in the western county of Västra Götaland were found to be the worst offenders, with 253 fines handed out.

This was followed by Jönköping County with 157. A total of 191 were fined in Stockholm County.

Fredrik Wallen, a spokesperson for East Region Police said it was not known why more people were fined in some areas compared with others.

“But generally speaking, we can see peaks of this when we are out and patrolling at large events and gatherings. It is of course natural that we have to catch these people in the act”, Wallen told Nyhetsbyrån Siren.

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Malmö Shaken By Another Grenade Attack

Via The Local:

Malmö in southern Sweden was last night hit by a fourth hand grenade attack in under a week – just 48 hours after another explosion rocked residents in a series of blasts in Sweden's third largest city this summer.

The hand grenade detonated in a car park in the Malmö district of Värnhem early on Sunday morning.

The incident, which caused damage to dozens of cars but no injuries, was different from previous blasts, according to police.

“Many of the other grenade attacks seemed to be aimed at government buildings”, a police spokesman told Swedish newspaper, Aftonbladet.

“But in the area around this detonation site there are private residences, business premises and government agencies. Therefore, the goal of the blast is unclear at present”, the spokesman concluded.

Police found part of a hand grenade at the site and bomb technicians have been on site to investigate further. The hand grenade seems to have exploded in a van, according to Swedish news agency, TT.

The police are checking the ownership of the damaged cars to see if any of the owners have links to the criminal world.

This was the fourth grenade attack of the week in Malmö. Council offices were targeted on Friday in Hålsjögatan, while on Thursday several cars and homes were damaged after a hand grenade was thrown at a building in a residential area of Limhamn in western parts of the city, just two days after a blast outside a community center destroyed two cars and injured one man.

Malmö police chief Stefan Sintéus said that he believed both Tuesday's and Thursday's attacks were linked to a case which saw three young men sentenced for their roles in a bombing in the Rosengård area – which has a reputation for violence and gang related crimes – on Christmas Eve.

“This is about a few people who are having a dispute with one another and are in a spiral of retaliation”, he told the TT news agency on Thursday.

Yesterday Sintéus admitted that he had asked for help from the national police in an effort to stem the violence.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Third Grenade Attack In A Week Rocks Malmö

Via The Local:

Malmö in southern Sweden was shaken by a hand grenade attack – less than 12 hours after another explosion rocked residents in a series of blasts in Sweden's third largest city this summer.

Police were called to the scene at Hålsjögatan in Malmö shortly after midnight on Friday after a grenade exploded outside a council offices building. Windows were shattered in the powerful blast which damaged several cars parked outside.

“Our forensic teams have concluded overnight that it was caused by another hand grenade”, police control room officer Peter Martinsson told Swedish Radio on Friday morning.

No one was injured in the explosion, which is the third in a series of attacks in the southern Swedish city only this week.

On Thursday several cars and homes were damaged after a hand grenade was thrown at a building in a residential area of Limhamn in western parts of the city, just two days after a blast outside a community centre destroyed two cars and injured one man.

Malmö police chief Stefan Sintéus said that he believed both Tuesday's and Thursday's attacks were linked to a case which saw three young men sentenced for their roles in a bombing in the Rosengård area – which has a reputation for violence and gang related crimes – on Christmas Eve.

“This is about a few people who are having a dispute with one another and are in a spiral of retaliation”, he told the TT news agency on Thursday.

It was not yet clear on Friday morning whether or not the night's explosion could be linked to the other attacks.

Malmö has experienced a summer of violence with numerous shootings and explosions taking place in recent weeks.

So far this year 18 incidents have led to Swedish police's national bomb squad (Nationella bombskyddet, NSB) being called in. Last year, over the whole of 2014, a total of 25 explosions took place in the city. Many of the hand grenades are believed to come from former conflict zones in the Balkans.

“This is a clear increase on previous years”, Göran Månsson, head of NSB Malmö, told regional newspaper Sydsvenskan on Friday and added that the city is the most affected in all of Scandinavia.

“Yes, I claim that it is. I have understood as much when I have met heads of other bomb protection groups in Norway, Finland and Denmark”, he said.

“They don't have the number of explosions that we have here, and I get a lot of reaction to and questions about the blasts in Malmö. Even in the rest of Europe they are very surprised at the number”, he added.

Police have previously linked some of the unrest to an increased import of illegal weapons and recently called for tougher border controls on the Öresund bridge between Sweden and Denmark in a bid to tackle the problem.

Last month they also revealed that they were stepping up their presence in known trouble-hit areas such as Rosengård and Seved, where they announced around 30 people believed to be from criminal backgrounds were being tracked by officers.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Refugees Shun Sweden Over Long Waiting Times

Via The Local:

Fewer asylum seekers are expected to arrive in Sweden in 2015. One of the reasons is that the Nordic country is no longer seen as a good place to seek refuge, the Swedish Migration Board said on Thursday.

A news prognosis by Sweden's Migration Board (Migrationsverket) brings the number of predicted asylum seekers down from the figure of 90.000 suggested in February to 74.000.

With around 80.000 people applying for asylum in Sweden in the past year, the Scandinavian country still welcomes more migrants per capita than any other EU nation.

But as news spreads about long waiting times and cumbersome bureaucracy, more and more migrants are avoiding traveling so far north, said the board on Thursday.

As The Local reported earlier this year, asylum seekers arriving in Sweden are likely to face a wait of up to six months before they can have their case heard, as migration officers struggle to cope with the workload.

“The processing times are pretty long compared to Germany, which has a fast-track lane, and integration in Sweden. It is difficult to get housing and jobs; this affects people's choice of destination country”, Anders Danielsson, head of the Swedish Migration Board, told the TT newswire on Thursday.

Germany, which receives the most refugees in Europe in real terms, is expected to have seen 400.000 migrants cross its borders at the end of the year. But other EU countries are also welcoming more asylum seekers. Hungary, Italy and France all accepted more than Sweden over the first three months of 2015.

However, Sweden still welcomes the most children in the EU. Around 12.000 children traveling alone are expected to arrive in Sweden in 2015, up from the previous predicted figure of 8.000.

“Half of all refugees in the world are children and a lot of them come to Europe. The number of children coming to Sweden is connected to the number of children in all of Europe rising dramatically”, said Danielsson.

Another reason behind the Migration Board's revised figures is that it has become increasingly harder to travel through Europe. France has set up controls its border with Italy, which Switzerland is also considering, and Hungary is erecting a fence on the border to Serbia.

It is estimated that more than 1.800 migrants have died so far in 2015 while making their way to Europe from war-torn nations such as Syria, Iraq, and Libya, in packed boats traveling in dangerous conditions.

Sweden's Foreign Minister, Margot Wallström, recently told The Local: “What if we lived in a war zone? We would also want to flee somewhere safe with our children, or try to secure a future elsewhere. It has to do with whether or not we are serious in the EU about our guiding principles – this will affect our credibility”.

But Sweden's open borders have been strongly criticised by opposition groups in recent months. The nationalist Sweden Democrats - backed by 12.9 percent of voters in the last general election - want the Nordic nation to limit immigration and several center-right parties have mooted the idea of giving refugees temporary rather than permanent residency permits.