Saturday, October 24, 2015

The New NASA Image That Is Predicting Food Shortages

Via Before It's News:

Scientists at NASA and elsewhere are predicting that the world will soon face serious food shortages because of a warming planet, which means it simply will be too hot and too dry to raise crops in many places.

“If we continue on our current course, it’s going to be hard to feed this planet because it’s so hot”, Ellen Stofan, NASA’s chief scientist, told Business Insider.

Stofan based her statement on recent NASA satellite images and studies showing that the number of places on Earth where it is too hot to grow food has been growing dramatically in recent decades.

Food shortages are possible because at temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit, photosynthesis becomes difficult and eventually stops, Stofan said. Photosynthesis is the process by which plants convert sunlight into chemical energy – food for the plants.

Are You Ready For The Coming Food Riots?

Data from NASA satellites — seen in the video below — indicates that many regions of the world are becoming too hot to raise crops. Stofan has spent years studying Venus, which has an atmosphere similar to a greenhouse and traps heat.

Collapse of Global Society Predicted

Others have reached the same conclusion.

“The results show that … the global food supply system would face catastrophic losses, and an unprecedented epidemic of food riots”, Aled Jones, the director of the Global Sustainability Institute at Anglia Ruskin University, told Insurge Intelligence. “In this scenario, global society essentially collapses as food production falls permanently short of consumption”.

Jones was speaking about a new report his organization prepared on the future of food. The report predicts that society will collapse by the year 2040 due to a worldview food shortage.

Is Syria Our Future?

A preview of how droughts and food shortages can cause a society to collapse is already taking place in Syria. A study published in The Proceedings of the National Academy Sciences in March claims that a drought in that region helped provoke the civil war that has devastated the nation.

Syria suffered what scientists consider the worst drought in that country in modern times. During the drought, up to 85 percent of the nation’s livestock died and around 1.5 million people lost their farms and were forced to move to cities, where there was no work for them.

This led to revolts against Bashar Al-Assad which eventually gave rise to all-out civil war, the report said. Around 200.000 people have died in the war, and 6 million more have been driven from their homes.

It would be not only nice, but it is necessary, the politicians and religious organizations in the affected regions have the courage to tell people to have maximum one child per family, before it's too late.

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